Episode 56b: Restoring Splendour

Ahmose Flies - Copy

The End of the Second Intermediate Period

The Hyksos are on the run, pursued by King Ahmose I and his warriors. Into the lands of Palestine they go, towards their final confrontation at Sharuhen.

Meanwhile, Queen Mother Ah-hotep leads the Theban army against a rebellion, in order to crush sedition and assert her family’s dominance.

Finally, the Thebans must rally in the face of environmental disaster, as the gods enact a sudden tempest.

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A soldier of the Middle Kingdom, bearing an axe and shield. Probably very similar to the warriors accompanying Ahmose I.

Sharuhen, now known as Tell el-Farah South. 

The golden flies of Ah-hotep; found in her tomb west of Thebes (Global Egyptian Museum).

The dagger of Queen Ah-hotep; copper, gold and silver. Found in her tomb west of Thebes (Global Egyptian Museum).

The axe of Queen Ah-hotep, found in her tomb west of Thebes (Global Egyptian Museum). 

The golden fan of Queen Ah-hotep. Ostrich feathers would have been inserted into the rim to create a cooling breeze (Global Egyptian Museum).

The copper hand-mirror of Ah-hotep, from her tomb at Thebes (Global Egyptian Museum).

The heir to the throne Ahmose Sapair; died at six years old, buried west of Thebes in a tomb later used for his grandmother Ah-hotep (Wikipedia).

The coffin and mummy of Sapair, found in the Deir el-Bahari Cache (more on that at another time).

Bibliography

Robert K. Ritner and Nadine Moeller. “The Ahmose ‘Tempest’ Stela, Thera and Comparative Chronology,” Journal of Near Eastern Studies 2014. Read for Free at Academia.edu.

W. Vivian Davies, “The Tomb of Ahmose Son-of-Ibana at Elkab, Documenting the Family and Other Observations,” Elkab and Beyond: Studies in Honour of Luc Limme, 2009. Read for Free at Academia.edu.

Aidan Dodson and Dyan Hilton. The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt, 2010.

Nicolas Grimal. A History of Ancient Egypt, 1994.

Anthony J. Spalinger. War in Ancient Egypt, 2005.

Reshafim.org – The Autobiography of Ahmose Ibana.

Reshafim.org – The Autobiography of Ahmose Pen-Nekhbet.

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